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Myths still abound over ‘access’ to EU market


Published Jan 27, 2016

william_d.jpgUKIP's National Spokesman and EFDD Group Co-ordinator on International Trade, William Dartmouth MEP has written to the Financial Times to correct the myths that still about over access to the EU single market.

In his letter, William, MEP for the South West of England, makes the point that, "Norway is not UKIP’s blueprint on Brexit. It never has been — nor, for that matter, Switzerland either."

He also reiterates UKIP's position that the UK, as the fifth-largest economy in the world, that runs a massive trade deficit with the EU, could negotiate its own tailor-made agreement and if that is not forthcoming, the UK would trade with the EU, as do six of the top 10 exporters to the EU, and 11 of the top 20, under World Trade Organisation rules.

Finally, his letter makes clear that a country does not need to be a member of the EU, or of the EEA, nor even have a trade agreement with the EU in order to have “access” to the EU’s single market.

Read the letter in full below:

Sir,

Following up on your report “Norway oil dispute with EU a lesson for Brexit fans” (January 19), I should like to make the UK Independence party’s position clear.

Norway is not UKIP’s blueprint on Brexit. It never has been — nor, for that matter, Switzerland either. Our position is that the UK, as the fifth-largest economy in the world, that runs a massive trade deficit with the EU, negotiates its own tailor-made agreement. If that is not forthcoming, the UK would trade with the EU, as do six of the top 10 exporters to the EU, and 11 of the top 20, under World Trade Organisation rules.

With reference to Professor Erik Oddvar Eriksen’s remarks and Norway being “unable to leave the [European Economic Area] due to the benefits of access to the single market”: in 2014 China’s exports to the EU were more than €302bn; the US’s were more than €206bn. Neither China nor the US currently have a trade agreement with the EU. They trade under WTO rules. A country does not need to be a member of the EU, or of the EEA, nor even have a trade agreement with the EU in order to have “access” to the EU’s single market.

William Dartmouth MEP
UKIP National Spokesman on Trade
EFDD Group Co-ordinator on International Trade

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