UKIP says "breath of fresh air" as EU national governments lift limits on methane emissions and leave British cattle free to belch

Published Jun 12, 2015

Stuart-Agnew-in-Plenary1.jpgUKIP Agricultural Spokesman Stuart Agnew MEP says British farmers, who had the wind up over proposed EU caps on methane emissions, will be relieved that national Governments have rejected the limits.

EU proposals to put stringent limits for certain air pollutants in each EU member state, including the methane gas produced by microbes in the stomachs of cattle and sheep during digestion of grass, were refreshingly rejected today.

Approval of the caps, under the National Emissions Ceiling (NEC) Directive, would have resulted in double regulation due to existing commitments relating to EU’s 2030 climate and energy package.

British livestock farmers were worried that the caps would have a massive impact on them.

Stuart Agnew UKIP MEP for the East of England, said today: “After much hot air I welcome the news that these caps have finally been abandoned."

“Farmers would have been hit by a double regulatory burden as the controls on pollutants are already in place under existing EU legislation." 

“Feeding sheep on expensive cereals and concentrates instead of grass, hay and silage may marginally reduce methane emissions but it would put every sheep farmer out of business."

"Farmers will be hugely relived no to have to try to measure the methane output of their animals, as the EU had originally demanded. The stuff does come out at both ends and I've never been sure just what measurement technique the eurocrats had in mind."

“It is a breath of fresh air to see common sense prevail through the rejection of the caps.”

Agree? Share!